Restoration

Restoration

Posted January 12, 2015 in The Pope's Corner:
What Happened at the Synod

by Pope Francis.

This excerpt from the pope’s concluding talk to the bishops at the Synod on the Family on October 19th gives a glimpse of the human and divine process of a synod, a very different view than you get from the media.

[This Synod on the Family] has been "a journey"—and like every journey there were moments of running fast, as if wanting to conquer time and reach the goal as soon as possible; other moments of fatigue, as if wanting to say "enough"; other moments of enthusiasm and ardour.

There were moments of profound consolation listening to the testimony of true pastors, who wisely carry in their hearts the joys and the tears of their faithful people.

Moments of consolation and grace and comfort hearing the testimonies of the families who have participated in the Synod and have shared with us the beauty and the joy of their married life.

A journey where the stronger feel compelled to help the less strong, where the more experienced are led to serve others, even through confrontations. And since it is a journey of human beings, with the consolations there were also moments of desolation, of tensions and temptations, of which a few possibilities could be mentioned.

One, a temptation to hostile inflexibility [trans: rigidity], that is, wanting to close oneself within the written word, (the letter of the law) and not allowing oneself to be surprised by God, by the God of surprises, within the law, within the certitude of what we know, and not of what we still need to learn and to achieve.

From the time of Christ, this has been the temptation of the zealous, of the scrupulous, of the solicitous and of the so-called—today—"traditionalists" and also of the intellectuals.

The temptation to a destructive tendency to certain kind of goodness [It. buonismo], that in the name of a deceptive mercy binds the wounds without first curing them and treating them; that treats the symptoms and not the causes and the roots.

It is the temptation of the "do-gooders," of the fearful, and also of the so-called "progressives" and "liberals."

The temptation to transform stones into bread to break the long, heavy, and painful fast (cf. Lk 4:1-4); and also to transform the bread into a stone and cast it against the sinners, the weak, and the sick (cf Jn 8:7), that is, to transform it into unbearable burdens (Lk 11:46).

The temptation to come down off the Cross to please the people, and not to stay there in order to fulfil the will of the Father; to bow down to a worldly spirit instead of purifying it and bending it to the Spirit of God.

The temptation to neglect the "depositum fidei" (the deposit of faith), not thinking of themselves as guardians but as owners or masters [of it]; or, on the other hand, the temptation to neglect reality, making use of meticulous language and a language of smoothing to say so many things and to say nothing! They call them "byzantinisms," I think.

Dear brothers and sisters, the temptations must not frighten or disconcert us or even discourage us, because no disciple is greater than his master; so if Jesus himself was tempted, and even called Beelzebul (cf. Mt 12:24), his disciples should not expect better treatment.

Personally I would be very worried and saddened if it were not for these temptations and these animated discussions; this movement of the spirits, as St Ignatius called it (Spiritual Exercises, 6), if all were in a state of agreement, or silent in a false and quietist peace.

Instead, I have seen and I have heard—with joy and appreciation—speeches and interventions full of faith, of pastoral and doctrinal zeal, of wisdom, of frankness and of courage: and of parresia.

And I have felt that what was set before our eyes was the good of the Church, of families, and the "supreme law," the "good of souls" (cf Canon 1752).

And this always—we have said it here, in the hall—without ever putting into question the fundamental truths of the sacrament of marriage: the indissolubility, the unity, the faithfulness, the fruitfulness, that openness to life (cf Canon 1055, 1056; and Gaudium et Spes, 48).

This is the Church, the vineyard of the Lord, the fertile Mother and the caring Teacher, who is not afraid to roll up her sleeves to pour oil and wine on people’s wounds; who doesn’t see humanity as a house of glass in which to judge or categorize people.

This is the Church, one, holy, catholic, apostolic and composed of sinners, needful of God’s mercy.

This is the Church, the true bride of Christ, who seeks to be faithful to her spouse and to her doctrine.

It is the Church that is not afraid to eat and drink with prostitutes and publicans. The Church that has the doors wide open to receive the needy, the penitent, and not only the just or those who believe they are perfect!

The Church that is not ashamed of the fallen brother and pretends not to see him, but on the contrary feels involved and almost obliged to lift him up and to encourage him to take up the journey again and accompany him toward a definitive encounter with her Spouse, in the heavenly Jerusalem.

The is the Church, our Mother! And when the Church, in the variety of her charisms, expresses herself in communion, she cannot err: it is the beauty and the strength of the sensus fidei, of that supernatural sense of the faith which is bestowed by the Holy Spirit so that, together, we can all enter into the heart of the Gospel and learn to follow Jesus in our life.

This should never be seen as a source of confusion and discord.

Many commentators, or people who talk, have imagined that they see a disputatious Church where one part is against the other, doubting even the Holy Spirit, the true promoter and guarantor of the unity and harmony of the Church—the Holy Spirit who throughout history has always guided the barque, through her ministers, even when the sea was rough and choppy, and the ministers unfaithful and sinners.

And, as I have dared to tell you, [as] I told you from the beginning of the Synod, it was necessary to live through all this with tranquillity, and with interior peace, so that the Synod would take place cum Petro and sub Petro (with Peter and under Peter), and the presence of the Pope is the guarantee of it all.

 

If you enjoy our articles, we ask you to please consider subscribing to the print edition of Restoration; it's only $10 a year, and will help us stay in print. Thanks, and God bless you!

 

Restoration Contents

Next article:
You See, This is Providence

Previous article:
The Day Uncle Charles Turned Ten

Archives



Syndication


RSS 2.0RSS feed

 
Madonna House - A Training Centre for the Lay Apostolate