Restoration

Restoration

Posted June 09, 2011:
A Woman Who Asked For Time

by Fr. Emile-Marie Brière.

A husband and wife came to visit the statue of Our Lady of Combermere, bringing with them their twin boys, who were then two years old. The mother had been diagnosed with terminal cancer.

She looked up at Our Lady and said, "You are a mother; I am a mother. Look at these two little boys. Don’t you think they need their mother for two more years?"

She went away and lived quite well for two years. Then she returned because again she was dying.

She said, "Mother of God, they are four years old now. Don’t you think it would be great if they had their mother for another two years?" And so it happened.

Toward the end of these two years, the woman had three terrible surgeries. She came again to see Our Lady and said, "I’m in so much pain that I don’t ask for healing. I ask only for the courage to bear with my pain. Would you give me one more year of life for my little boys, who are, after all, only six?"

Over the next year, strangely enough, the woman began to improve. In fact, she improved so much that she was able to take care of her twins—as well as her husband, who had fallen seriously ill. When the four of them came back to visit Our Lady, the family prayed not for the mother but for the father.

After that, they returned to the statue of Our Lady of Combermere every year. The parents no longer ask for healing for they were both well.

They bring other people to her, too, people who are in some physical or mental pain. There is a radiance about this husband and wife which they surely did not possess before visiting Our Lady here in Combermere.

 

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